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Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Still Snowing!

OK, so Monday was closed while everyone dug out of the blizzard from Saturday and because the Metro and buses weren't fully in service. Yay, snow day!

Then....Tuesday was closed as well while people STILL dug out and Metro and buses STILL weren't fully in service, AND because of a new storm due to arrive Tuesday.

  Now we're in the middle of the second blizzard in a week, still no school and it's Wednesday. Some places are closed all week. I'm watching someone cross country ski down 16th street, one of the busiest streets in DC and the one that leads straight down to the White House. We've just passed the mark for the snowiest winter literally ever in DC's history, and might eventually set the record for shortest summer break ever for DC students.
  My days have followed fairly predictable cycles during the blizzards. Eat, do a little school work, do some dishes, eat some more, do a little writing, and then start in on the near-constant refreshing of the various bearers of important information: The school closings list, the federal government status, and the weather forecast.
  Schools start announcing closures, and the numbers steadily increase throughout the day. 114, we're at 114! Now it's 189. We've passed the 200 mark! Another milestone during this phase is the point at which the first school starting with "D" announces its closure, thus opening up what will eventually be my category between the "C" and "E" districts. Apparently C and E make their decisions earlier than the District of Columbia.
I check back in often to see what the current total is and to try to correlate that with the chances that DC will close as well. A burst of closings comes in the evening, and then around 5, DC decides our fate for the following day and posts this on their website.
  I then try to be one of the first people among my colleagues to disseminate this information, posting a new Facebook status and sending text messages. The evenings are then usually spent emailing with colleagues about what a crazy week this has been and, more recently, being smug about not having planned out the next day that is now not going to happen. Life is too short to plan school days that won't ever come to pass. Following the smugness is a wave of guilt for having so much time off, and a nagging feeling that I really should be using this time more productively. At night I get a few things done for school, watch some TV, eat some more, and hit the hay.
  Then, mid-day the next day, there comes a critical hour when the number of schools with announced closures drops dramatically from around the 400-500 range to below 100, and that is when the whole cycle begins once again. Checking for information, trying to beat colleagues to the punch. More eating.

At the moment I'm in the phase of rapidly refreshing and trying to calculate the chances of being closed for a fourth day. The hour of reckoning is soon upon us. Anyone else in the DC area having a similar cycle to their days?

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